Some Pantry Organization Tips For Your Home

According to the National Association of House Builders, 85 percent of home purchasers consider a kitchen pantry “necessary” or “desirable.” There’s a strong desire to expand and upgrade pantries in existing houses, with options ranging from walk-in closets to impromptu solutions like open pantry storage along basement stairs. Some mason jars and rice storage dispenser Malaysia would not compensate for the mess

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Although pantries are traditionally used to store food, there’s no reason you can’t fit a few plates, kitchen electronics, and baskets to carry linens, paper products, and cleaning supplies in there as well. Don’t forget to include the dog bowl.

The ideal location is one that is cool, dry, and accessible. A total renovation provides the greatest alternatives, but it isn’t the only one.

Space in the Annex

Consider shifting an inner wall to make place for a pantry on the cooking side instead of knocking down a wall to open up the kitchen to the dining area.

Select a Recess.

Pantry shelf can be mounted on a wall near a prep area or even squeezed in between studs.

Repurpose

Imagine a jacket or broom cupboard as a pantry if you aren’t getting much use out of it. There’s no rule that says you can’t put the dustpan in there as well.

Outburst

Unheated, shed-like lean-tos were common in colonial pantries. The contemporary version is a one-story back extension with a half bath or vestibule.

Look at the ground.

Install a standalone unit in a cold, dry basement; solid, open wire shelves contain everything and are simple to access. Alternatively, hang boxed open shelves down the stairwell to create a built-in ladder.

Think About Your Shelving Options

Size, Depth, and Adjustable Storage Shelves for a Walk-In Kitchen

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Walk-ins are typically 5 by 5 feet in size and can be filled with U-shaped open shelves or cabinets, with or without a countertop.

Adjustable shelves give you more options. For bulkier products, start with bottom shelves that are 16 to 18 inches deep and placed 18 to 24 inches between; for cereal boxes and canisters, construct shelves at eye level that are 12 to 14 inches deep and set 14 to 16 inches apart. Spice and can shelves may only require 6 inches of space from front to back. Allow 2 inches of vertical room when preparing for any item so you can simply tip or slide it in and out.

Tips for Choosing or Creating Pantry Shelves

Plywood is the most common material for racks that can be completed with iron-on veneer band or wood trim—but other materials (if handled carefully; see below) can also be used.

Install cabinets if you despise looking at things. Choose uppers with typical glass fronts if dust, not clutter, is a concern.Pay attention to where doorways swing, whether on a cupboard inside the kitchen or heading to the pantry itself, to avoid door jams. Some pantries don’t have any doors at all.

Use a ceiling fixture—a pendant might be lovely—or rechargeable puck lights using motion sensors to light it up. Smaller things can be stored on organizers like slow Susans and stacked shelf extensions to avoid the game of hide-and-seek. Get some rice storage dispenser Malaysia

Maintain a cold and dry environment, preferably below 70°F and 45 % humidity. Is there no air conditioning? Connect a tiny dehumidifier to the outlet. Is there no place to plug in? Use a moisture-absorbing product like Arm & Hammer’s. 

TIP: Adding outlets beneath shelved kitchen equipment, such as a microwave, is a good idea.

Ensure that there is sufficient space between shelves.

Before deciding on a shelf material (34-inch plywood, half-inch MDF, etc. ), go online and look up “Sagulator” to see how far the bookshelf can span before sagging under the weight of textbooks and tinned food.